Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Those with school age children with ADD/ADHD

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    93

    Default Those with school age children with ADD/ADHD

    Do any of you manage the ADD without medication? My son is 3 1/2 and I truly fear that when he enters school they will label him ADD. I believe my dad has ADD, but he has managed to live with it and compensate. I just can't see my son sitting still for hours at a time and paying attention. He has trouble already in Sunday school. (On Mother's Day he took off his shoe and threw it across the room, um, I have no idea why!) Perhaps things will change in the next year and a half, but I really think he is more challenging then other boys his age, and my friends have even commented on it. I don't want to put him on medication. I would home-school before doing that, but I'm wondering if anyone else manages the ADD without meds, and what you do. Thanks you for any responses.

  2. #2
    Suzi is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    4,258

    Default We medicated starting at age 7 1/2...

    so you have quite a few years to go before he is at the age where they make the dx and having to make that decision if he has it. She was already in a specialized school for children with LD and every possible accomodation was being made. She started the medication and wow, the difference was unbelievable.

    I don't know why you are anti-meds, but if I were you, I'd do as much research as possible about the meds and how they work and why ADHD children may need them. There are also studies out there suggesting that children with ADHD do better in life with medication and therapy, that ADHD children who aren't medicated are at higher risk for drug abuse and suicide. I'd speak with a professional who knows all about the pros and cons of medicating. We really didn't have a choice...even homeschooling would not have helped. It was either she not take it and fail or take it and do really well. There was nothing in between for us.

    Adding: I'd agree that you should try everything now. I'd read alot about how to provide a very structured environment with consequences for poor behavior choices. I wish we had been firmer at younger ages and that we had learned how to handle her differently. We saw a behavior therapist for parenting advice and that really helped. My dd's main problem was paying attention in class (not hyper) and how do you make a child pay attention?
    Last edited by Suzi; 05-22-2007 at 09:12 PM.

  3. #3
    mickey2's Avatar
    mickey2 is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,565

    Default

    you may want to look into diet changes. many things like dyes, persatives,etc can aggrivate add/adhd. you can do a google search for adhd/add diets to get an idea of what some find helpful.

    mckevor can not have add/adhd meds due to his mito. per his neuro, he is the most hyper kid he has ever treated in 25yrs. this was said when he was only 1yr btw and he still stands by that statement. his official dx is more hyperactivity as we cant really determine yet the attention part but it could be his cp from birth trauma, autism, sensory or mito issues at play too.

    we dont medicate my 17yo dss anymore. he self medicates with energy drinks now. we didnt medicate until he began failing in middle school despite our best efforts at all alternatives. he had some major depression due to this and it was pure helll for all of us. for the past 2yrs, he finds the energy drinks work just as well w/o the side effects and worries of the meds. ie liver function tests via blood draws etc.

    in general, those with neuro issues add/adhd, asd, bipolar, etc have a tendancy to become depressed more so than the typcial kids. so whether you opt for meds or not, i strongly urge seeing a therapist on a regular basis to learn ways to cope with stress/anxiety etc.

    a neuropsych can rx meds and most do, but some will try alternatives first. www.chadd.org can point you to support groups in your area where you can get an idea of what docs prefer in terms of tx's. and tons of other stuff too hugs

  4. #4
    zoeyz is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    3,371

    Default

    I have an 8 year old in 2nd grade who is not medicated. He has improved greatly with regards to impulse control. He seems to be learning what he needs to do in school to succeed. He still struggles with math, but not enough that I want to medicate him.

  5. #5
    KaylieS Guest

    Default

    I'd get on amazon...there are alot of books on adhd and parenting or helpig. Just read the reviews b/c not all are equal!

    I have one I really like on The Myth of the ADD child or something like that. Basically it doesn't say it's a myth, but just that it is not a "diseased" child, just a child with different needs. It has a section on 50 ideas to help your child and they are categorized based on your child's needs.

    It is primarily geared towards kids w/attentional prob but I would be you'd find some good ideas in it. It is really my fav book for dd (who has some mild attentional prob).

    I'd start with some books liek that - try what you like, toss out what doesn't work...he's young enough you have some time to see what works.

    Also...he *is* young. A lot will change, I promise you, before he starts school. When my dd was 3 she was still hitting/kicking/spitting etc and now her outbursts are mostly verbal and she/we have learned when she loses control she needs downtime in her room to regroup. That's just an example.

    Of course, last night, she hit ds and he bit her. *sigh* they both went to their rooms for that one.

    Kaylie

  6. #6
    KaylieS Guest

    Default

    Suzi, I ran across something interesting and thought of you.

    I have NO memory...so bear with me. Somewhere, I read about what happens when we are bored. basically, in a research study, when they bored people, their imagination was stimulated...lots of firings all across the brain.

    I really want to find the article because there was some good detail in it, and a lot to consider (like tv...if you get bored watchign it, does it stimulate the imagination?).

    But what *I* got out of it, is that you take a kid and make them do "boring" school work (their interpretation), then their brain wanders. And according to this article, it's not really their fault.

    If you believe that ADD kids (attentional) have the ability to focus just fine when they are interested in the task, and that the tasks they like are different than the tasks that "traditional" learning kids like, then the study really makes sense.

    Like my friend's ds (who was hyper and inattentive) who had a very hard time in school focusing and was medicated...came to my house on a saturday at 10 yrs old and spent 8 yrs straight packing boxes to help me move. No problems w/his focus that day at all. But see, he likes that stuff. he's the kid who takes apart old toasters and microwaves to see how they work, and who loves recycling and as an 18 yr old is in technical school to become a mechanic to work on his first love, garbage trucks.

    you ask how do you make a child pay attention? Well, for teaching dd, I learned very quickly I could not teach in a "traditional" manner or she would stare at the ceiling and tune me out. She essentially forced me to teach creatively, w/games and songs and moving our bodies around the room to act things out, and she did awesomely!

    Oh, and strangely...she took an alphabet learning tablet one day in the car and started practicing her letters on her own to keep from being bored in the car...yes, the same exact activity that I could not get her to focus on in the classroom!

    It's hard to say if an add child doesn't focus b/c the activity is not the right one, or if their ability to focus in general and not have the brain fire "imagination" is different in them...but it certainly explains why they sit and daydream in class instead of listening!

    Kaylie

  7. #7
    Suzi is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    4,258

    Default

    Thanks for the info. My dd was already in a classroom that w/ teachers who are experts at working with children with LD and ADHD. It is not a traditional school. Maybe it is a combo of both ADHD and LD that makes her attention issues even worse. The teacher told me for 6 straight months that she had to constantly bring her back on task and that she could not focus on her work. I can see now in 4th grade that she is alot better at paying attention in class without medication. I can see that she may get to the point where she doesn't need it any longer.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    93

    Default Thank you all!

    Your information was very helpful! Kaylie, that information sounds just like my son. That is why I think non=traditional teaching methods as opposed to medications may be what he will need. I am just worried about being able to get the right methods, especially in a public school.
    I will also look at some books on parenting kids with ADD. And I will look at some dietary issues. DS does have egg and dairy intolerances, so there may be more food issues too.
    Thanks everyone, you gave me a lot to think about!

  9. #9
    KaylieS Guest

    Default

    you said "Maybe it is a combo of both ADHD and LD that makes her attention issues even worse."

    I think you hit the nail on the head! If someone is telling you something and it's not "jiving" for whatever reason (like the dyslexia), then it becomes harder to focus...add that to a general attentional problem and wow, what a challenge for your dd! It would be like having a teacher speaking in a foreign language and expecting you to pay attention and not have your mind wander!

    I"m glad she's doing better now!

    Kaylie

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •