Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Any advice on disaster swim class?

  1. #1
    ybab is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,542

    Default Any advice on disaster swim class?

    My DS loves swimming. He gets in the pool and has a smile on his face the whole time (and ends up swallowing a lot of water as a result! ). Anyway, he just had a lesson - beginner class with just four kids (including his twin sister). He was a big pill during the class, not following along or even attempting to, always last to go across the pool. The teacher ended up with two classes - him and the other kids, and had to either help him along or ignore him and help the other kids. I didn't help at all, I think, by sitting right there, reminding him of a promised 'reward' if he played along, and showing my increasing frustration with his behavior.

    Anyway, the teacher ( a young woman) said something like "O.k. for listening, you three get an 'A', and you (my DS) get a 'B'". Well - he immediately burst into tears. It really upset him. The teacher did a good job trying to recover (joking with him, spinning him around), but he was still very hurt.

    So he's willing to go back and try again - but I don't have a clue how to avoid a repeat of last time. I can't figure out if he's not listening b/c he doesn't understand, or b/c he's willfully ignoring the teacher (he can be very opinionated about what he wants to do). Any suggestions? I'm stuck. I was really hoping to avoid pricey private lessons - but it's not fair to the other kids if he keeps getting so much individual attn. Advice appreciated. Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    601

    Default We did the pricey private lessons last summer, but

    it was because my son has sensory issues, and he couldn't take all the splashing that the other kids did during the group instruction at his daycamp. He related well to his instructor one-on-one. But, it would have been nice if ds had benefited from the group lesson. I would be interested in reading other moms' responses.

    Regards,
    -Carol-
    (ds, 6 yrs old)

  3. #3
    LL2 is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,308

    Default

    I'm struck by the fact that, when he was *told* he wasn't a good listener, his reaction would suggest that he cared about the implied loss of approval. Or is it just that he is very competitive and didn't like that the other kids had gotten A's and he had not? A little insight into that would probably affect my answer. Any thoughts?

  4. #4
    jeninnc is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,923

    Default

    well, we do one on one. The sensory issues make it too overwhelming.

    My first ? would be to ask if he enjoyed the lesson. If he didn't, perhaps it's not the right environment. If he did, well then you need to enforce the rules. Maybe you can remind him of his reaction to the "B" effort before the swim lesson next time and that this is his last shot before yanking him from the class?

  5. #5
    justLaura's Avatar
    justLaura is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,376

    Default

    Sensory overload is really hard for swimming lessons. We actually took a year off and started up again (now that DS is on another medication and is a year older -- age 8). It's gone much better this time.

    Laura

  6. #6
    zoeyz is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    3,371

    Default

    Since he's willing to go back and try again, I'd try it again. Don't sit where he can see you, but let him know you're nearby. If it goes poorly a second time, then sign him up for private lessons. I'd give him a second chance though, particularly since he seemed regretful about not having followed directions etc. My older son was a lot like this but with a bigger group lesson. Over the years, there has always been a kid who was afraid of the water and required one-on-one attention during group lessons. I'm sure they're used to things like this happening. I agree it shouldn't go on indefinitely for the sake of the rest of the class, but they should cut you a little slack to see if he transitions in after a couple of tries. Good luck

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    142

    Default

    I don't have any advice, my ds had 8 weeks of swim lessons this summer, 4x per week, and not once was he able to put his face in the water by himself. He moved up a level at one point but got demoted back down to the first level, while his twin brother moved up two levels. But, he has sensory processing disorder. He's in OT now, and I'm hopeful that next summer it'll be easier! If it's not, we'll probably have to do the private lesson route ultimately. We'll see.

    Some kids are helped by goggles, so that could be something to try, but I think for us they were a hindrance, ultimately, and now all my kids refuse to do swim class without them.
    -beth

  8. #8
    pepperlc is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    6,365

    Default

    I find that although Jacob loves swimming lessons, they are very hard for him. There were only 4 boys, two of which were himself and his twin. It was difficult for him to sit and wait his turn but he got better at it as the weeks went on. He would also get very crazy at the end because he was tired and possibly overstimed. We did once a week for 3 months and there was definite improvement by the end in behavior.

    The teacher also started a reward program. If they were good for the whole class (30 min.) they would get 5 jumps into the pool at the end. Each time she had to talk to one of them about their behavior they would lose a jump. This happened to Jacob 2 times and that helped turn things around.

    Keep up with it. I bet you see improvement as you go on. If not you might have to go to private lessons where there is no waiting.

    Oh yeah, about goggles. Reuben loves them and Jacob hates them. They were the biggest distraction to him.

    Good luck
    karen

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •