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Thread: Angeleena....or others, can you tell me more about

  1. #1
    amelia1 is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default Angeleena....or others, can you tell me more about

    therapeutic listening?

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    angeleena is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default Hey there

    Hi,
    we did it for a while and are hoping to go back to it. I could not really figure out how to explain it, so I just copied this from a website I have used. Maybe you have already been here?
    http://www.sensory-processing-disord...listening.html

    Ella was helped by it. My brother who is a recording engineer and music producer thinks it might be bulls*it though after listening to it. But, we think she was helped, so we are trying again very soon. Anything that might work....ella liked it too. It may have overstimulated her to begin with, and then after a week or so, seemed to calm her.

    Are you going to try it?


    Therapeutic Listening
    By Michelle Morris

    Listening is a function of the entire brain and goes well beyond stimulating the auditory system. We listen with our whole body. In order to fully address listening difficulties one must also attend to the listening functions of both the hearing ear and the body ear.

    One such approach that addresses the multiple facets of listening is Therapeutic Listening [Listening With the Whole Body]. The main idea is to emphasize integration of the auditory and vestibular systems together. Since there is such a close connection with visual functioning, visual processing also will likely improve. Particularly spatial awareness, and the concept of time and space. [Eichelberger, 2002]

    When a Therapeutic Listening program is being implemented, as with all interventions based on the principles of Sensory Integration, a therapist relies on the client's cues to determine appropriate strategies [Kimball, 1993]. A child may be very active while listening, working on suspended equipment, and three-dimensional surfaces, which further challenge postural organization, motor planning, and higher-level sensory integration skills. The use of sound and music is so intimately connected to movement that children on listening programs are often compelled to move and explore the environment in new ways [Listening With the Whole Body]

    It appears that sound stimulation alone facilitates the process of listening and social engagement [Porges, 1997]. However, to maintain and expand on those changes it is critical to engage the child in functionally and developmentally relevant activities that allows the changes to become a part of daily life skills [Listening With the Whole Body].

    The equipment required for listening therapy are headphones that meet specific requirements, a CD player with special features, and CD's that are electronically altered, based on the ideas and the technology created by Alfred Tomatis, Guy Beard, and Ingo Steinbach. Depending on the child's treatment goals, the therapist will determine which music, modulation, and activities best suit the child.

    When used in conjunction with Sensory Integration Therapy, improvement is usually seen in:

    *

    alertness, attention, and focus
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    receptive and expressive language, including articulation
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    balance and motor planning
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    affect and emotional responsivity
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    self-motivation
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    awareness of the environment
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    postural security
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    spatial awareness
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    initiation of play behavior
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    initiation of verbal interaction
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    modulation of sleeping, eating, toileting, alertness, emotional
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    stability [Eichelberger]

    What does all this mean, you might ask? Sensory Integration Therapy is enhanced, it works better. The treatment is addressing more issues, and stimulating more senses. Results are usually seen earlier than without the Listening Program.

    In my personal experience, with my own boy utilizing Listening Therapy, I saw almost immediate and dramatic changes. I noticed regulation of his internal organs. He suddenly had a normal appetite, and began eating full meals, instead of "picking" through the day. His bowel movements became regular. He stopped wetting himself. For the first time in his four and a half years he began sleeping through the night.

    His art became focused and complete, not random scribbles. He began hearing letter sounds that he had not heard before. He became calmer, attentive, and alert. His balance improved. His thinking and planning increased. He could plan a project or task, think it through, and complete it without frustration.

    Typically, a child listens to music for two-thirty minute sessions each day. This became a wonderful opportunity for us to interact at home. We worked on projects, letters, writing, building sets, coordination, and numbers. He loved dancing and singing with the music. I could see that it enhanced his ongoing therapy.

    It was also very helpful to us to use the Therapeutic Listening Home Program Chart. With a few words written each day we were able to track his progress, and see changes. Over a period of weeks we could already see the benefits. Talk to your child's therapist to see if this program could be of benefit to your child.

    IMPORTANT!! Before buying any CD's, headphones, or CD players for this program, make sure you read the "Therapeutic Listening Guidelines".

  3. #3
    jeninnc is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default

    We just started. Our OT uses Vital sounds. You can go to the website vitalsounds.com to learn more about it.

    Our OT has a loner kit that we are taking home this week, so I will let you know how it goes!

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    Two of my kids are doing listening therapy in conjunction with OT. Here is a brief discussion of this http://www.starcenter.us/services.html :
    "Listening therapy uses specific sound frequencies and patterns to stimulate neural activity to the brain and central nervous system. Specifically, our individualized listening programs affect the vestibular and cochlear systems of the inner ear. These act as a relay station for sensory input to the brain, and provide a foundation for integrating sensory input. The process is so pleasant that clients of all ages look forward to coming to listening sessions. Those who are just listening (w/o OT as part of their program) are free to do a number of activities, or to simply rest, while those listening simultaneous to OT perform specific activities overseen by a therapist.
    The purpose of combining OT with listening therapy is to create a most effective therapy possible within a relatively short time frame. By employing both methods concurrently, we are able to more effectively stimulate the vestibular, cochlear, tactile, and proprioceptive systems. These systems play key roles in our motor planning, language, learning, auditory and visual processing, as well as our physical and psychological sense of self. Additionally, the combined therapy provides a broader therapeutic approach, enabling us to help individuals with a wider variety of difficulties. This includes those with AD/HD, learning difficulties, motor planning problems, autistic spectrum disorders, auditory processing disorders and sensory processing disorders."

    My two kids have both sensory processing and auditory processing disorders - my understanding is that with auditory processing, there are certain frequencies that are more difficult for them to hear, so we hope this will help.

    The listening program they use was created by Ron Minson, who trained with Tomatis (the guru of listening therapy). I don't know if there's any info on the website - this might be a new website http://www.dynamiclistening.com/

    I am on the fence about the new iPod system that they are now selling with headphones that do bone conduction, mostly for the other two kids who undoubtedly have also inherited similar auditory issues, but who don't seem to have enough full blown sensory problems to bother with OT. http://www.integratedlistening.com/

    We don't know whether it works or not just yet, since my kids are only halfway thru the program. One good sign - the speech therapist has been impressed so far. I'm not holding my breath.

    That's all I have - we're doing it but we don't know yet if it's going to help.
    -beth

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    amelia1 is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default Thanks everyone!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by amelia1
    therapeutic listening?

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    mickey2's Avatar
    mickey2 is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default we do it

    we use the program called The Listening Program. its modulated classical music which my kids likes better. with some of the other programs with the kids songs, he focused too much on the nonsense ryhmes and words to get any benefit. we started originally with OT when he was 2.5yo. he ws such a good responder to it that we purchased a set of CD's and cd player and headphones.

    we redo the program every 4-6months or as needed with him. for a while this summer, we thought the cd's had been stollen out of my car. turns out they were in a suitcase front pocket that never got unpacked from a previous trip in the fall. we are looking/considering the new ipod version with all the music on it as a few cd's are now scratched after 4yrs.

    we have no regrets on using it for ds and sometimes even dss. the one thing i suggest is keeping a log of how your kid is after/before the sessions. my kid has to sipping thick liquids and spinning/swinging counter clockwise while listening to his. most kids do better sitting and not eating/drinking during the session. a good ot should be able to find the right program for your kid and how/she responds best while listening. hugs

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