Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: is 5 too young to test for ADD?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    420

    Default is 5 too young to test for ADD?

    I think we're heading for a whole new set of issues with Evan. I haven't taken any online tests, but I think there's a good chance that he has inattentive-type ADD.

    The dear child just can't hold a plan in his head for more than a second. I have seen him literally drift to a halt in the middle of the staircase because he forgets that he's going down. This morning he was sitting on the piano bench and I told him to put his coat on. He got off the bench and started walking upstairs. I said "your coat!" and he said "oh!" He stepped down and headed for the kitchen. I said "coat!" again and that time he got it.

    His teacher says that he is constantly misplacing his work, schoolbag, etc. You ask him where something is and he has no idea. I've seen him in school a fair amount and he just seems "zoned" -- I can't think of a better word. She said that all of the other kids have learned the morning routine, but he just stands around looking foggy.

    The sad part is that when you push him to locate something he's lost he says "I can't find things! It's just the way I was born!" The last thing I want is for his self-esteem to be further damaged.

    I know it is part sensory. Maybe a lot sensory. The teacher commented spontaneously that he is a million times better after recess, when he spins round and round on the "roundabout." Weird: his OT used to do therapeutic Kawar spinning with him to "wake up" and organize his sensory system. Dh has started doing some spins with him but he's too big now. We are going to get a disk swing or something. When he's really "zoned," he is also physically floppy.

    I am also increasing his morning metabolism meds (carnitine) in case that is affecting him. We really fuel him up at breakfast but that doesn't mean his body's extracting the energy.

    Anyway, my question is . . . should I get an eval now? What do they do this young? His 504 does not cover ADD but I could start the process.

    I'm a beginner on this one . . . thanks for any help! I've spent some time on www.aboutld.org but have not been able to find that much on inattentive ADD in young kids.

    Lisa

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    420

    Default

    I should add that he does seem to be learning in school. When the teacher calls on him, he knows the answer. He tells us stuff he's learned. So, I am not completely panicked (yet) -- just wondering how best to help him. Thanks!

    Lisa

  3. #3
    angeleena is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    1,267

    Default

    Hi Lisa,
    it sounds like you are doing a great job of being a mom. I just wanted to say that my Ella sounds exactly the same as your son. She is 4 and we have to tell her at least 3-4 times about everything and she forgets what she is doing all of the time in the middle of what she is doing. With her, I think a lot of it is sensory stuff...but I think ADHD is coming through too. I was thinking of asking her doc about it. Half of the time Ella is just plain zoned out and it is hard to get in to reach her. She is back in OT now weeky so maybe she will be doing better soon.

    It sounds like a good sign that he is learning well. That is great. Maybe he does just need some "sensory diet" stuff. I know Ella is a different kid after swinging. We are going to try to make a swing inside our house. We have a swingset outside of course, but we live in Oregon....and it is raining this time of year or is too cold.

    Maybe you should try OT again, or is he still in OT?

    Also, what is this morning carnetine (sp) for? My girl will hardly eat anything, especially in the morning before school...sometimes a little juice or milk is all she will have. I would like to give her something that will give her lots of energy to learn at school, but not too much energy if you know what i mean.
    What do you give it for?

    Thanks!
    Angi

  4. #4
    zoeyz is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    3,371

    Default

    I don't know the answer to that. We had DS tested when he had just turned 7, although it took a while to get the appointment, so I he was 6 when I requested the evaluation. Even then I wasn't sure what I was having him tested for specifically. I figured they'd draw their own conclusions, and they concluded ADHD, which still seems right on the money for him. We requested a whole child type of evaluation, but in reality I'm not sure that's what we really got. Best of luck,

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    428

    Default Quick Reply

    I'm at work so my reply will be quick... I would also ask the school to screen him for APD (auditory processing disorder). APD and ADD/ADHD can "look" alot alike.

    -Robin
    DS w/ APD

  6. #6
    jeninnc is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,923

    Default

    You know our paper just had this great artical about how sensory stuff can mask as ADHD. Ellie's developmental pediatrician is a big propronent of ADHD, ASD and SID being all apart of each other. She will screen starting at age 5, but I think better screening comes at 7 ir 8 after the brain has matured a bit. The fact that he does better after recess and spinning means he is craving that input - back to the sensory stuff.

    Google it, I know there are tons of ways to help organize the ADHD kid. We are going to see the developmental ped on Friday - and I plan to bring this up to her again to get her thoughts.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    420

    Default

    Hi Angi, Evan has a mitochondrial disorder, a defect in the way his body turns food into energy. Our doc, a researcher/clinician at JHU, believes that it is linked to PDD; in fact he calls it "mitochondrial PDD." You can google it if you want to read more (doc's name is Richard Kelley) -- the short version of our story is that Evan was dx'd with PDD, but I kept seeing so much variability in his functioning (physical floppiness coinciding with increased ASD symptoms) that I strongly suspected that something metabolic was going on -- just in the layperson sense of "he seems to have a systems-wide lack of energy." We got blown off by several different departments at CHOP; for example, their Metabolism group did three rounds of testing and said it was all normal. Our neuro said that it could not possibly be mito because there was no cardiomyopathy . . . anyway, thanks to some wonderful women on this very board (Kris if you are lurking, thank you again forever and ever!!!), who encouraged me to trust my instincts, I did not give up. Eventually (another long story) I made email contact with this JHU doc and asked him simply to tell me whether I was crazy for pursuing it further. My luck, he knew the group at CHOP and knew we were likely to get blown off -- so he offered to review Evan's CHOP lab reports. Right away he saw a problem and brought us to Baltimore within days. He did some very simple tests (that CHOP should have done but didn't!) and started Evan on carnitine (an amino acid that activates certain metabolic and neuro pathways) and an antioxidant cocktail. It has made a *dramatic* difference. Evan now tests non-autistic on the ADOS. He definitely has Aspie characteristics and may end up with an Asperger's dx (it fits!), but he is miles from where he was at 2 1/2.

    Uh, sorry, that was the short version?!?!?! :-)

    Anyway, carnitine is available OTC, and I do know that some parents give it OTC. I don't know much about that. We get Rx (L-Carnitor) for purity and strength control. But, it's just an aid to metabolizing food, not itself a source of energy (as I understand it!).

    Lisa

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    420

    Default

    Thanks Zoey,

    From what I've read, 7 seems to be about the right age for distinguishing ADHD from the other related conditions. It may be that we just have to focus on symptoms for now. I have put in calls to our developmental ped and our developmental psych to get their input. (Not like we lack for experts!) Thanks!

    Lisa

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    420

    Default

    Robin, this is great input, thanks. It definitely looks like APD to me sometimes too. I will have to be saying "check him for everything," I think!

    Lisa

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    420

    Default

    Jen, thanks for reminding me about this -- I remember that Val had posted a bunch of great info on this topic a while ago. (Val, if you are lurking, and you ever have a second to re-post that, I would be so grateful! I found some articles via google on comorbidity, but not on one being mistaken for the other.) I spoke with our former OT this morning and she firmly believes that there is a huge sensory component for Evan. It makes sense, esp because I see his CP symptoms get worse when his inattentiveness climbs too. She mentioned that the OT who developed the spinning technique that we used now has a spinning board so you can do the same with an older child who is too big to pick up -- I am going to look for it and price it out.

    As I mentioned in my post to Angi above, Evan is definitely on the spectrum somewhere, so it all fits.

    I will google for some resources. I am also going to try to see what we need to do to get the school's spec ed teacher to give us some input.

    Thanks!

    Lisa

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •