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Thread: Low tone - we have a diagnosis...

  1. #1
    jeninnc is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default Low tone - we have a diagnosis...

    For Lacey (7). I am kicking myself for not seeing it earlier. The OT at school did an informal evaluation as a favor to me - Ellie's got her wrapped around her finger and the OT loves her!

    They wont serve her though as it is not impacting her enough to have her fall below her grade level. Insert me rolling my eyes. Any ideas about forcing the issue or am I out of luck?

    Mild hypotonia and fine motor weakness leading to poor pencil grasp. Very poor handwriting. She's very clumsy and floppy. She's also very tall and thin (my dh is 6'8"). She's about 52" and 42 lbs, which I think magnifies the floppyness. She responds pretty well to the lap pad that I have for her, but I am looking for other ideas. I fully believe her add tendencies tie into the sensory stuff, as does her teacher.

    I have no knowledge about low tone/hypotonia - that was the one thing Ellie did not have any weakness in. Of course, right? Any links/suggestions for me?

  2. #2
    BriNJ is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Jen,
    Im a lurker usually (hang around to see if I can help anyone- DS was formerly special needs) but your Lacey sounds like my Cait. Caitlin is 6 and is a very tall/thin floppy kid (just turned 6 and shes 40lbs and 48inches). She's always had borderline gross motor skills (normal but low) and was dx'd this year with coordination disorder/dyspraxia (we had to rule out many things to get here including seizures, hearing loss, ASD, AD/HD etc). She has normal strength but poor control leading to a dx of low tone. She shows distractibility if you measure distraction by head movement and eye contact (the typical measure) but we now believe that its part of the whole...she is paying attention, she just doesnt look like. Her handwriting has gotten much worse now that they are forcing the kids in kindergarten to sit and write a certain way. She also has issues coloring in large blocks of color- yets draws well. Caitlin's teacher does her best to work with her but in meeting with the school, there really isnt anything that they can/will provide on a formal basis.

    We had DD evaluated by a behavioral neurologist who gave us teh dx and is working with us to have the school work with DD. This might be a way to go to get a formal dx because without it, you have a very low chance in getting the school to help her (in our case, the best that the school can/will do is provide accomodations...ie: she can sit however she wants, more time to complete work etc). If your DD receives a dx like ADD with another dx like coordination disorder, you'll probably have a much better chance of having the school get involved.

    SOrry that I dont have real advice- but our girls sound quite a bit alike.
    Bri

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    Default An idea...

    I don't have any direct experience except to say my 5 yr old has very bad handwriting even for his age. I mentioned it to a friend and she suggested I get him a "stress ball" and have him squeeze it while watching TV to strenghten his hands and arms. No luck so far but it does get thrown around alot.

    Also, my DS does not quality for speech but the school's SLP did admit he as a lisp. So I met with the SLP and she worked with me so I could work with him at home. Maybe the school's OT can outline exercises you can do with her at home.

    Good luck! This is my experience with my kids's school...

    -Robin

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    Default Another thought...

    I just had another thought... ask the school's OT for a formal diagnosis. Even if your DD does not qualify for services (IEP) she could quialify for a 504 plan which will allow for classrooom accomidations. This may not be important now, but will in future grades.

    -Robin

  5. #5
    sugarsue is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default I have not read the other responses yet

    but I wanted to say that our OT helped Sierra's grasp a lot. She had a horrible grasp. One thing she got was a pencil grip that properly positioned her fingers on the pencil. That was really great. I still have to remind her to use her good grasp. She falls back when she is lazy or not paying attention.

    I'm very glad that you have some direction to go in regarding all this. Good luck!

    Susan

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    pepperlc is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Can you get her some private OT? I know the schools won't just give OT support which is quite short sighted in my opinion but would include OT in other services provided. Does she have any other needs?
    karen

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    NancyR is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default How's her trunk control? Maybe you can use some

    of her symptoms to get some PT in to evaluate and add PT to her services? Work on trunk strength, shoulder and arm strength, etc...??

    Other things that you can do on your own to help (and as the OT for suggestions too) would be the basics that would help with trunk strengthening: swimming, bicycle riding, horseback riding, swinging, kids yoga, therapy ball exercises. Also, hand / eye coordination and upper body strengthening games such as frisbee, catch, badmiton or tennis, monkey bars, trapeze, climbing wall, etc...

    HTH! N

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    jeninnc is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Quote Originally Posted by pepperlc
    Can you get her some private OT? I know the schools won't just give OT support which is quite short sighted in my opinion but would include OT in other services provided. Does she have any other needs?
    karen
    Yes I am having Ellie's OT evaluate her when we are off track in April. She has no other needs as far as the school system is concerned.

  9. #9
    jeninnc is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Quote Originally Posted by BriNJ
    SOrry that I dont have real advice- but our girls sound quite a bit alike.
    Bri
    They sound like mirrors! Everything you described fits Lacey. She is also fairly athletic but has very poor coordination - which kills her confidence.

    I'm going to talk to the teacher about going the ADD route since she has those charastics anyway, and see if I can't qualify her.

  10. #10
    trek is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Hi, some things that majorily helped Grant 8-low tone, fine motor issues.

    -Pencil grips
    -Sitting on therapy ball at table
    -slant board
    -various pencil grips
    -crab walking before sitting/writing
    -lying on stomach while writing

    Grant was unable to sit on a chair until this year. And when sitting always looked like he would fall off. His writing was horrid until this January.
    Also, his drooling abated-he drooled until he turned 8.

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