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Thread: 26 degrees + shorts - yay or nay?

  1. #11
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    I don't think that small children (under 7) have a fully developed sense of temperature so I don't think there are 'natural consequences' for not wearing warm clothes in cold weather.

    Exposing the body to cold temps does increase the chances of sickness - it doesn't *cause* a cold or flu but it does increase the chance of getting one if you are exposed to the germs/virus.

  2. #12
    nph39 is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default Well, I think that any child old enough to be in school is old

    enough to comprehend the temperature on their body. We haven't encountered this problem yet at ds (bless his little heart) at age 5 will pretty much wear anything I put out for him. But I did have a friend who's child insisted on shorts in the winter in Wisconsin. She fought this battle daily (and usually until she won) and then later started losing more important battles (like drugs) so I've given it a lot of thought.

    IMO shorts v. long pants isn't a battle I'd fight. I'm pretty sure that I read in "Love and Logic" that it is a battle that really is not worth fighting. The child will get cold (or not!) and eventually...when the parents stop nagging...wil wear appropriate clothing. In the meantime I would insist that something warm be put in a backpack "just in case" the child got cold at school. The same goes for heavy jackets vs. light jackets, hats vs. no hats, gloves vs. no gloves. DS has gone out plenty of times without gloves when he should have had them only to come back in at some point to "get my gloves!" Having something warm in the backpack will ensure the child doesn't miss recess etc.

    Quite honestly, we just had the coat issue about an hour ago. I picked up ds at his friend's house and he didn't want to put on a coat to go outside and get in the car. It's 29 degrees with about 4 inches of snow on the ground. I was fine with it.

    Now, if it's -29 with high winds and frost bite is an issue within 5 minutes...then I might argue. Or, we just wouldn't leave the house.

    Only my opinion,
    Nadine

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by nph39 View Post
    ... any child old enough to comprehend the temperature on their body.
    ...
    Only my opinion,
    Nadine
    I don't think it's a matter of comprehension, it's a matter of developing the ability to determine temperature. Which, if I remember correctly happens around 7 or 8 years old.

    I don't get the 'battle' part of this, it's like brushing your teeth, it's just something you do. Is it an option to brush teeth before bed? Of course not, so why would it be an option about wearing appropriate clothing in cold weather?

  4. #14
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    sgd is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    I have a 15 year old ds who has had clothes "sensitivity" issues since he was a baby. He wears a uniform to school, but always wears the shorts (we live in Kansas, so it certainly is cold here at times) and the short sleeved shirt. He won't wear the sweatshirt because it is too tight around his neck (so he says) and wouldn't even try on the pants to see if he could stand them.

    He also won't wear a winter coat. The only coat he will wear is a light weight zip up hoodie.

    I used to argue and fight with him (when he was smaller and went to public school - there were times that I could talk him into wearing the windsuit type warmup pants in the winter).

    His teachers have talked to me about it (I work at the school) and I tell them that he's a big boy and he knows enough to know if he's cold. When he was younger, I used to try to explain his issues with certain clothes, fabrics, etc., but 99% of them didn't get it and thought that I was just letting him get his way all the time.

    He's known as the kid who always wears shorts at his school, but honestly, I think he sort of enjoys the notority these days. He swears up and down that he is NOT cold and I guess I have to believe him.

  5. #15
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    Default we had a guy at work like this -

    but it was in Sydney and the weather never got *that* cold - I don't think it ever got below freezing but it was cold enough for a coat but I never saw him in anything but shorts.

    Our mailman seems to be the sameway, it's around the freezing mark during the day here, snow on the ground but not a lot of wind and I haven't seen him in anything but shorts.

    the difference to me is young children vs older children/grown ups, if a grown man wants to wear shorts in cold weather, well that's up to them, if small children wants to wear shorts in cold weather, different story.


    Quote Originally Posted by sgd View Post
    I have a 15 year old ds who has had clothes "sensitivity" issues since he was a baby. He wears a uniform to school, but always wears the shorts (we live in Kansas, so it certainly is cold here at times) and the short sleeved shirt. He won't wear the sweatshirt because it is too tight around his neck (so he says) and wouldn't even try on the pants to see if he could stand them.

    He also won't wear a winter coat. The only coat he will wear is a light weight zip up hoodie.

    I used to argue and fight with him (when he was smaller and went to public school - there were times that I could talk him into wearing the windsuit type warmup pants in the winter).

    His teachers have talked to me about it (I work at the school) and I tell them that he's a big boy and he knows enough to know if he's cold. When he was younger, I used to try to explain his issues with certain clothes, fabrics, etc., but 99% of them didn't get it and thought that I was just letting him get his way all the time.

    He's known as the kid who always wears shorts at his school, but honestly, I think he sort of enjoys the notority these days. He swears up and down that he is NOT cold and I guess I have to believe him.

  6. #16
    BriNJ is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    At this point, I will not allow my children outside for any long length of time without a coat if I feel that I need a coat in that weather. I will allow them to choose a hat, scarf, gloves etc but the coat is a necessity. The kids are 7 and 8 and I've seen them start to shake, blue lips etc and still swear that they werent cold. I dont think that they can really gauge temperature right now. In a year or two, I'll be ok with leaving it up to them, but right now, I've seen that they just cant decide on thier own. DD especially, who is underweight, gets cold very easily (even in a 70degree bathroom, she shakes after a bath for a few minutes to the point she cant talk easily because her teeth are chattering).

    So no, right now, if I wear a coat, they wear a coat if they'll be outside for any length of time. There is no way that I'd allow them to wear shorts and I also do not allow DD to wear a skirt without leggings this time of year. In teh house, when it warms up etc, thats all fine but now- no way.

  7. #17
    Troy is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    I think the issue is the level of exposure. If you are going for a day of hiking, the parent has to control the exposure. If you are talking about standing at the school bus stop and running from the bus to the school, and then back again, that's probably not going to be a big deal unless the weather is REALLY cold -- colder than 26 degrees.

  8. #18
    SaraV is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default Wow, different trends different places...

    That is SO not a trend where I live, for which I'm very glad.

    Our elementary school actually requires snowpants for grades K-3 and strongly encourages them for 4-5. And they all wear them. My kid has never asked to wear shorts in the winter and I have *never* seen a kid at his school wearing shorts in sub-freezing temps. They go outside for a half-hour or more, and play in snow and ice. Kids with short pants would not be allowed to do this. Nor would they be allowed to stay inside - there is no "I don't feel like going out." We're told that if your kid is too sick to play outside in 20 degree weather, they are too sick to come to school. So a kid who went in shorts would be sent to the nurse, given loaner sweatpants and/or snowpants, and sent outside in them.

    Appropriate clothing for the weather is something I will make a stand for, because below a certain temperature, it is more than just fashion, or "you don't catch cold from being cold." Below a certain air temperature, exposed skin eventually freezes. Which is painful. Very.

    I had a friend in college who came up to Michigan from Florida. Her first December, she headed out for a day of Christmas shopping without gloves - and came back with her fingers stiff and white. "Why didn't you wear gloves?" we asked. "I thought they were, y'know, for added comfort or fashion, but not a necessity." She told us.

    If temps are above freezing I give the kids more leeway -- their choice to be shivery or not. But below a certain temp (and the 20s certainly qualify), they're wearing proper clothes.

  9. #19
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    haha I used to do the same thing with crunching icicles in my hair. I remember being in HS and my friends and I would watch the little grade 8 and 9ers walking down the hallway *freezing* their butts off in their short skirts, short shirts, no jackets, etc. By grade 12 my friends and I gave up on fashion for functional winterwear and figured, eventually, these younger students would wisen up themselves. They did.

    As for the original post, it's not a mountain I want to die on. I believe in 'cause and effect'. My children hear that from me all the time. I've also come to realize what I consider cold isn't so for my children and what I consider toasty warm is boiling to them. So I embrace our difference and ask they put a sweater/extra pants, etc., in their backpacks. If they're cold they'll put it on. I figure they generate more heat b/c they're constantly moving.

    If it was much colder than -3C/26F I'd fight the battle a little harder, but I never have to. When the temperature drops to -10C or lower (14F) the kids naturally cover up more.

  10. #20
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    Oops! Must have been on the second page when I read this-- it's a rather old post.

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