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Thread: Need QUICK help please - Is ADD considered...

  1. #1
    Christine S Guest

    Default Need QUICK help please - Is ADD considered...

    a Learning Disability? I'm filling out a school form for Ame and need to know.

    Thanks!

    C

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    249

    Default Not in the traditional sense....

    at least not in Georgia. It comes under Other Health Imperment (OHI) here. You can get services and accomodations in Georgia under OHI. We are changing dd's classification from ADHD/OHI to ASD, which is entirely separate. Although she will continue to get the same services, ASD is viewed differently.

    Hope this helps.
    Charlotte

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Default

    I think here in CO it is under OHI as well.

  4. #4
    Christine S Guest

    Default Thanks, we are in CO also so I'll put that down.

    It has another area to fill out specific issues so I filled it in there.

    C

  5. #5
    Val. is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    3,854

    Default

    Ditto what they said....OHI here and you can access all the same services.

  6. #6
    Christine S Guest

    Default Thanks! I put OHI and will speak with the...

    principal about the issues next week. We have just decided to change schools to a new charter school here. I'm hearing great things about them and they seem much more willing and capable of helping her reach HER full potential, not the *numbers* they want for the school itself. If all goes well this year, T will go there next year.

    C

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    249

    Default RE Charter School....

    Dd is starting at our new charter school on Monday. We have her transitional IEP meeting on Friday. They have to meet all of the services provided by the public school. It will be interesting how this goes b/c they wanted an all-inclusive approach to teaching, but that doesn't/work work for dd. We are insisting on resource services, separate from her regular classroom. It's already in her IEP.

    I'll let you know how it goes.

    HUGS
    Charlotte
    Morgan (10.5) ASD/ADHD

  8. #8
    Christine S Guest

    Default Good luck with all of it.

    I am debating if we will need an IEP or 504 for this year. I really don't feel we need any major accomodations though, just minor things. And I'm going to start a list of issues to speak to the principal about. From what I hear, the principal is ready to do what she can to help out with the SNK's and the principal's asst is actually the Special Needs coordinator as well. Fingers crossed it all works out for both of us!

    C

    Quote Originally Posted by Teryn
    Dd is starting at our new charter school on Monday. We have her transitional IEP meeting on Friday. They have to meet all of the services provided by the public school. It will be interesting how this goes b/c they wanted an all-inclusive approach to teaching, but that doesn't/work work for dd. We are insisting on resource services, separate from her regular classroom. It's already in her IEP.

    I'll let you know how it goes.

    HUGS
    Charlotte
    Morgan (10.5) ASD/ADHD

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    39

    Default OHI is a SpEd classification

    In order to receive services under the OHI classification, you'll want to get in touch w/the SpEd Director, SpEd Superintendent, or whoever the SpEd administrator is in your district. There is a process you'll need to work through to get the designation.

    To get the Otherwise Health Impaired label, you will probably have to have Ame's doctor document her condition. In ds' case, he was originally- before the AS dx- classified as OHI because of his multiple severe food allergies. After our ped completed her forms, the SpEd Director had to document how the allergies would preclude ds from functioning w/in the typical curriculum and how special accomodations would have to be made for him. At the preschool level these were things like not being able to participate in fine motor projects like making fruit loop necklaces, counting exercises that typically utilize M&Ms, making "squirrel snacks" that include nuts and popcorn, during their science unit, etc. But it also included things like having to have epi-pen trained personnel in his classroom (or at least accessible to his classroom), having medical action plans in place, and keeping and epi-pen and benedryl with him at all times. School policy dictates that medicines have to be locked in the office and administered by designated personnel, typically the secretary. Kids who can self-administer emergency meds are allowed exclusions (for example an asthmatic w/a rescue inhaler or an older child w/an epi are exempt) and can carry their meds themselves. Having his meds w/him to be adminstered by any trained personnel, was written into IEP so that he could have his epi and benedryl in his backpack and in the classroom.

    In our district, kids w/ an ADD dx typically have 504 plans but aren't SpEd. The 504 plans allow them to test separately or with additional time, keep a spare set of text books at home, use a homework planner that has to be signed off by the teacher and the parents each day, etc. It all depends on the particular child and what his needs are and whether or not their condition warrants a SpEd classification and an IEP.

    You may already know all of this, but I didn't want you to walk into the principal's office saying Ame is OHI, because w/out the formal classification, you can request accomodations, but technically, the school doesn't have to provide them.

    Good luck w/the principal.

  10. #10
    Christine S Guest

    Default Thanks for the info Deb! It's all very helpful.

    I'm not sure we NEED the IEP or the 504, but I want to be prepared.

    C

    Quote Originally Posted by debmc1
    In order to receive services under the OHI classification, you'll want to get in touch w/the SpEd Director, SpEd Superintendent, or whoever the SpEd administrator is in your district. There is a process you'll need to work through to get the designation.

    To get the Otherwise Health Impaired label, you will probably have to have Ame's doctor document her condition. In ds' case, he was originally- before the AS dx- classified as OHI because of his multiple severe food allergies. After our ped completed her forms, the SpEd Director had to document how the allergies would preclude ds from functioning w/in the typical curriculum and how special accomodations would have to be made for him. At the preschool level these were things like not being able to participate in fine motor projects like making fruit loop necklaces, counting exercises that typically utilize M&Ms, making "squirrel snacks" that include nuts and popcorn, during their science unit, etc. But it also included things like having to have epi-pen trained personnel in his classroom (or at least accessible to his classroom), having medical action plans in place, and keeping and epi-pen and benedryl with him at all times. School policy dictates that medicines have to be locked in the office and administered by designated personnel, typically the secretary. Kids who can self-administer emergency meds are allowed exclusions (for example an asthmatic w/a rescue inhaler or an older child w/an epi are exempt) and can carry their meds themselves. Having his meds w/him to be adminstered by any trained personnel, was written into IEP so that he could have his epi and benedryl in his backpack and in the classroom.

    In our district, kids w/ an ADD dx typically have 504 plans but aren't SpEd. The 504 plans allow them to test separately or with additional time, keep a spare set of text books at home, use a homework planner that has to be signed off by the teacher and the parents each day, etc. It all depends on the particular child and what his needs are and whether or not their condition warrants a SpEd classification and an IEP.

    You may already know all of this, but I didn't want you to walk into the principal's office saying Ame is OHI, because w/out the formal classification, you can request accomodations, but technically, the school doesn't have to provide them.

    Good luck w/the principal.

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