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Thread: Anyone know about compression/joint compression?

  1. #1
    emzeegee is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default Anyone know about compression/joint compression?

    So today was the big day, when we had DD evaluated/discussed with a Developmental Psych - apparently this city's best person for it.

    It was a hard, emotional thing for me and DH to do - but at the end of the day worth it because we are now armed with a few more strategies to help us help her. One of the things she suggested was compression - like really strong hugs and such a 'sensory diet' of compresion/pressure. She actually suggested playing games with DD where we put her under the couch cushions and pretend to 'sit' on her. She thought DD would quite like the pressure. Since that meeting I've been playing 'pancakes' with DD, where I hug her and squeeze her various joints to 'flatten her into a pancake'. I then 'sprinkle' her with sugar and maple syrup and eat her up. She LOVES this and asks me to do it LOTS and asks for it harder and harder. We're hoping that by fulfilling her need for pressure, we will help to keep her from hanging (quite painfully) on DH or I. (She often does it at dinner, etc - hanging off or leaning on us to the point of painful for us.) Tonight (after a day full of pancakes) she hardly leaned on DH at all (a small miracle for us.)

    So my question is....is there a more formal way to do this with her? Is there a specific method I could or should follow?

    TIA!

    Michelle

  2. #2
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    Making that deep pressure accessible to her should be fun, just like you described!!!!! Is there an occupational therapist on staff at the office you brought her to? She might be able to give you a list of other fun activities to try. Otherwise, I think I have a great list at school I can send you, once I go back for the year!

    We have ahd kids on very strict times sensory diets and others who we have just taught to self regulate and know when to ask for "squeezes", we have provided kids with weighted vests and blankets, spandex sacks to play in, heavy back backs to carry around, trampolines, rocking chairs, etc.


    Kerry



    Quote Originally Posted by emzeegee
    So today was the big day, when we had DD evaluated/discussed with a Developmental Psych - apparently this city's best person for it.

    It was a hard, emotional thing for me and DH to do - but at the end of the day worth it because we are now armed with a few more strategies to help us help her. One of the things she suggested was compression - like really strong hugs and such a 'sensory diet' of compresion/pressure. She actually suggested playing games with DD where we put her under the couch cushions and pretend to 'sit' on her. She thought DD would quite like the pressure. Since that meeting I've been playing 'pancakes' with DD, where I hug her and squeeze her various joints to 'flatten her into a pancake'. I then 'sprinkle' her with sugar and maple syrup and eat her up. She LOVES this and asks me to do it LOTS and asks for it harder and harder. We're hoping that by fulfilling her need for pressure, we will help to keep her from hanging (quite painfully) on DH or I. (She often does it at dinner, etc - hanging off or leaning on us to the point of painful for us.) Tonight (after a day full of pancakes) she hardly leaned on DH at all (a small miracle for us.)

    So my question is....is there a more formal way to do this with her? Is there a specific method I could or should follow?

    TIA!

    Michelle

  3. #3
    Val. is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    For the joint compression, our OT gave us a detailed instruction page on how to do it properly. She also showed me in the office. We did it every two hours, I believe, along with brushing and other "sensory diet" type games and activities. Celebrate those small milestones. Here's to another day of no hanging.

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    LL2 is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Often kids who are deep pressure kids also like impact. We're pretty relaxed (in our house, not other people's) houses about building with the couch cushions, we have an inflatable mattress they prop up on the back of the couch and roll down, etc. We also play "Timmy Taco" and "Emma Enchilada" where we roll them up snugly in a blanket and yell "Where's (name)?" and then unroll. Emma also has a game she loves called "Pizza", where you pretend she's a - well, pizza! First you roll her out (round foam rubber cushion is perfect for that), spread on the sauce (massage), sprinkle on the cheese (light tickle for a change of pace), slide it into the over, back out, cut it up, etc.

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    Default They worked for us!!!

    Michelle,
    My middle daughter Katie was severe SID. I say was very proudly. When she was a baby/toddler she was so hard to deal with. She wouldn't eat anything but dry cereal, she would not walk in the grass/sand ect. She also would not keep clothes on which became a problem in preschool. She also would hang on us, lean into the wall, the therapist called it melting. We started SID therapy when she was 3. We did the brushing, joint compressions and weight resistance. It was really tough at first. We did it 4 times a day. It was our after meals and snack activity. She also had a weighted vest that she would wear that worked wonders. Katie got to where she craved it/loved it. She would bring me the brush/vest and would push her shopping cart all around the house. We filled the shopping cart with weights so she had to push against it. I am proud to say that she just celebrated her 7th B-day. She is a great 2nd grader. She has some fine motor skill issues but she is just like all the other kids. Her teachers do notice that she will go off on her own sometimes after she gets over stimulated. She also does this when she gets home. We call it "decompressing". It is funny, SID kids seem to regulate themselves as they get older. The only difference in her and my other kids is that she is a really picky eater. She doesn't like to have her back and arms scratched lightly like my other girls but she loves for me to rub her arms and back really hard. That is the only dif I see.
    Let me know if you have any questions.

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    sugarsue is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default It's great for us!

    Especially with Savanna who really needs heavy work (lifting heavy stuff, chewy things and pressure on her body). Before her SID diagnosis, she would love for me to sit on her! I thought it was nuts and it would not be my whole weight, but it was pretty heavy and she'd ask me to do it over and over and just laugh!
    She is a big hanger too and still does hang on me but when it's making me crazy, I get her a task to do (jumping, lifting or give her compressions) and she is much better!

    I'm glad you found something she responds to. Did you get a diagnosis for her? What are your next steps? I know there is formal brushing and compressions but other than that, I think it is whatever works (at least for us, that is how it's going).

    Susan

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    sugarsue is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Those games sound so fun! I agree with the impact side of it. Savanna likes for me to just "slap" her body. She takes off her clothes and lays on my legs and I pound on her with my palms. She LOVES it and always wants more. But she always says "Beat on me Mommy" or "Slap me" and I figure we need to get a cute name for the game, like "kneading bread" or something.

    Susan

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    mickey2 is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default in addition to that already mentioned

    the book called "the out of sync child has fun" is dedicated to activities that help kids with various of all types. you can buy it thru amazon. if you need someone from the states to buy and ship to you. let me know, i'd be glad to. the book is a great source of ideas for me. hugs

  9. #9
    anniemc2000 is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default Dd worked with her OT on joint compression

    Her OT taught me a brushing protocol, which was to be done 3x a day, followed by joint compression. She demonstrated it to me, so it's hard to explain, but at the large joints, like elbows, you grab an area below and above the joint and press them toward the joint. I will see if she gave us any handouts. We also did some of the games you're doing. For older children, she recommended pushing against the wall to get pressure.
    Good luck with everything- I am glad you have some suggestions to work with.
    Ann

  10. #10
    emzeegee is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default Thanks for the great ideas everyone! More..

    To answer the question of 'what now' - basically the psych gave us a few things to start working on with her (like the compression thing). This was mainly a background info meeting - not a formal assessment as I thought it would be. In any case she is meeting with DD again in about 6 weeks or so, to see how we have gone with the strategies she has given us, and to have a more one-on-one session with DD. Reading your posts, though, has made me think about calling her again for an OT referral. I've been looking at chewy toys too (to help DD re-focus from chewing on other odd things) so if anyone has info on that - thanks!

    Also those who said they had sheets on how to brush/compress - I'd appreciate it if you guys could scan/email those. MUCH appreciated!!

    Michelle

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