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Thread: What happens to SID children if they aren't

  1. #1
    Suzi is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default What happens to SID children if they aren't

    diagnosed and treated? I have a 14 year old niece and nephew who are really extreme about what they will eat, wear, etc. My brother is the EXACT same way as are families members down through the generations. I'd bet my bottom dollar that it is SID. Back when my niece and nephew were little, there was no knowledge of SID issues. Now my nephew is having some real anxiety issues surrounding school and he is VERY dependent on his mom for security. Just curious if those two could be related? What happens to chlidren who aren't diagnosed and treated?

  2. #2
    trek is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    I think most learn to function as they approach teenage years. I might have fit SIDS or some other disorder if I had been evaluated 38 years ago. I know my mom did take me to a Dr since I never stayed still.

  3. #3
    danellsar is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    This is my dd. She wasn't diagnosed as SID until she was 8. By that time, we were unable to get help from anyone (public or our insurance) for her to get the treatments she needed. We could not afford private OT (dh is a public school teacher, I am currently a SAHM but have taught in the past), so she got no treatment. I did what I could at home, being untrained and having no knowledge of what to do.

    She's mostly coping, but not really well (she's almost 12 now). She still has major issues with small and large motor coordination, balance, and some emotional stuff. She's very melodramatic and goes way overboard emotionally at the drop of a hat (worse since she hit puberty!!!). we are currently looking into having her work with a psychologist to try to resolve some of the emotional bagage. She has a terribly hard time making friends because she's so "prickly" all the time, and so really doesn't have any close friends.

    Basically, it s*cks that we couldn't get her the help she needed.
    Ellen

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    I think that in some ways, anyone with sensory issues finds ways to adapt to these problems on their own in some way. Some of these self adaptations are positive, and some not so much. I think there are many people who manage fine on their own, but in the best case scenerio--help/direction can really make a huge difference. For my youngest son (3-autism)... he does alot of sensory stimming to calm himself/when he is frustrated (running,humming,vocalizing,flapping,jumping etc) at first I thought this was the problem, but now I almost see it as his way of handling sensory overload/deficets. When we really work with the sensory diet..these behaviors are less and attending skills improve. I think that knowing what things help him and by having the help of the OT I am better able to work with him (and CALM him). But to be honest.. it hasn't helped with the tactile/oral sensitivies. And no matter how many whistles they have him blow he still won't eat sticky/gooey food LOL. My DS sensory issues are not his only issues... but they have a major impact on our day to day life for sure.

    With my older DD, we didn't even explore SID until 10. It wasn't until I was working with the OT for my son and looking at the screening questionaires.. scratching my head at how much of it fit my dd too. I feel like we really missed the boat here. She has found her own ways of handling things... but I does make me angry that maybe things could have been easier for her if we would have had more direction. Looking at things just through ADD eyes we really didn't give her many tools that really could have helped and are helping some now. Ellen I'm pulling up a chair right next to you.. sounds like we face many of the same challenges--the emotions are hard at this age without these extra problems ((hugs)) I can really relate to your frustrations.

    Concerning your nephew.. I think that fears and dependancy can definetly be related to SID. It is something worth looking into even now and surely can't hurt anything. Have you talked about your concerns with their parents?

    -Joy
    Last edited by JoyAnne; 10-27-2006 at 10:40 AM.

  5. #5
    Christine S Guest

    Default Undx'd and untreated SID...that would be ME.

    I learned to *cope* with the things that bothered me. Unfortunately, coping also means at times I just have to escape from it. I'm still particular about my food (though I've mellowed somewhat in the last 10 years), still particular about my clothes, still particular about things around me. I ended up being a functioning, yet quirky adult.

    Another side of the SID effects would be my personality. Because I was so overwhelmed with the SID issues, I became very shy and didn't talk. To this day the shyness still haunts me. I've learned to get around it at times, but since I didn't have that early interaction with friends I often feel as though I have few social skills. It's probably not as bad as I FEEL as I do manage to function and I do have friends...it just doesn't always feel right to me.

    I think the parents play a huge role in this as well. I grew up with a very kind and understanding mother. If I'd had a mother who got frustrated with me and angry I wouldn't do certain things I'd likely have turned out differently.

    Hope this helps. At least at this point I can recognize my own issues and let others know "hey that loud music is hurting me".

    C

  6. #6
    Suzi is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine S
    I think the parents play a huge role in this as well. I grew up with a very kind and understanding mother. If I'd had a mother who got frustrated with me and angry I wouldn't do certain things I'd likely have turned out differently.
    C
    His mom is very kind and understanding, but to a fault, kwim? She's never allowed them to "suffer" any kind of challenge or negative in their whole lives! Seriously! It is really hard to explain. She overindulges everything. This is my niece and nephew who are 14 years old and still sleep on their parents floor every single night because they are too afraid to be up in the bedroom on the 2nd floor---but also because mom is too afraid that something might happen to them if they are upstairs. It is all twisted together. I'm just wondering is SID plays a part in all of this? That she's seen their sensitivity to things and tired ot make their world perfect so that they've never had to face anything. Now that they are getting into high school and are being faced with all kinds of different challegnes and he is just not coping very well. Tummy aches, problem some anxiety, etc. Maybe it is just general anxiety or separation anxiety, but wondering is SID children are more prone to anxiety issues?

  7. #7
    Suzi is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoyAnne
    Concerning your nephew.. I think that fears and dependancy can definetly be related to SID. It is something worth looking into even now and surely can't hurt anything. Have you talked about your concerns with their parents?

    -Joy
    No, I've not brought it up seriously. I've said something briefly about nowadays kids who have such severe problems with being picky eaters and have to have tags cut out of their clothes and socks turned inside out and have to have the same pillow to sleep or their heavy quilt to sleep, or afraid of loud sounds, etc might be dx with SID. This SIL would probably not take unsolicited advice/suggestions from me so I'm keeping out of it.

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    Default This question and all the replies are so interesting....

    ... I was going to lurk, but I just couldn't. (I'm at work, so unfortunately this message will be short.)

    I'm so glad that there is so much more knowledge of sensory issues these days, and that there is public funding for helping young children. Early Intervention, CPSE and CSE are working wonders for Menachem. But, I'm noticing sensory issues in his twin brother, who is considered "typically developing", and who never had any of the intervention therapies. First it was just the labels in shirts, and not wanting to eat wet mushy food. But some of the issues which you mentioned are also affecting him: stomach aches, extreme separation anxiety even if dh and I want to go out for dinner by ourselves for a few hours, not wanting to be in a room by himself even for a few minutes. We have been taking a wait-and-see approach and hoping that he will grow out of it, since we doubt that he would qualify for any services at this time. But this thread has made me aware that perhaps we should be more proactive.

    Thanks,
    -Carol-

  9. #9
    SueW is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Wink they become Indigo Children....

    seriously, this (undiagnosed sid) is probably quite common. parent's and others prob dealt with it in on way (helpful, considerate) or the other (squashed it and blamed or ridiculed the child). what happens to sid kids as they grow up anyway? are certain vocations more suitable? i can see kids with autistic spectrum disorders attracted to solitary professions requiring great attention to detail (taxonomy, accounting, statistics, music) and perhaps sid kids to art, social work, teaching??? anyone know of studies on how these kids deal with life as adults?

    sorry for my bad typing - I had wrist/hand surgery yesterday and the splint and tylox don't help at the keyboard - Sue

  10. #10
    angeleena is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default I think SID and anxiety are related....and on a positive note

    I think my brother (now 49) had SID and way oversensitive hearing....now he is a recording engineer, music producer, genius musician....so maybe some of the SID stuff can help later in life.

    I also feel that SID and anxiety are linked.

    I was A VERY anxious child, and had SEVERE sep anxiety, etc....and now my DD has tons of anxiety and SID.

    Anyway, I guess if SID is left untreated kids probably figure it out on their own unless the parents treat them badly because of all of the difficulties...then they might turn into troubled people.

    Just my 02c
    -Angi

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