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Thread: WHERE does SID come from? genetic, enviromental exposure, unknown??

  1. #11
    sugarsue is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Your brother reminds me of my mom a little. She was so adamant that there was nothing wrong. She kept saying, "I was just like that as a kid, there's nothing wrong with her" and I"d think, "Hello!?!". But then she came and stayed with us on one especially bad weekend and she was convinced after that.

    I'm glad you are feeling better today!

    Susan

  2. #12
    sugarsue is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default That is interesting (pic inside)

    I wonder if anyone has looked at any hemangioma connection. But hemangioma's are similar to SID in which the don't know exactly what causes them and are common in premature children (girls mostly). I'm glad your dd's have faded! Poor Savanna had a critical one on her forehead and had to have 7-8 surgeries.

    Here she is at 5 months old. She's 4 now and it is close to being gone...

  3. #13
    angeleena is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default hmmmn, my dd had

    the cord wrapped around her neck, a plummetting (sp?) heart rate, had to be suctioned out, was blue and had low apgar scores when she was born. She probably should have been taken C-sect but I think the ob/gyn dropped the ball.
    I guess I sort of spent too much time guilting myself about the meds, to remember about her traumatic birth. Holy cow.

    Thanks for this!

    I am going to bring this up with her dev ped at her next appt and hopefully she will have some answers too.

    THANKS!
    -angi

  4. #14
    SaraV is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    If a frequent lurker can chime in...

    I think a lot of it is genetic. I had a textbook pregnancy and delivery (there was meconium staining at DS's birth, but his apgars were 9/10 and he never showed signs of distress). Heck, he was even a very calm baby, except for the whole cluster feeding thing. He's slept through the night since he was 10 weeks old.

    But he's got lower-body tone issues, and issues with proprioceptive sensing as well as being low-input in hsi lower body, and having a number of other issues that line up with SID, including sensitivity to sounds, sensitivity to tastes, and extreme hair issues....

    And every time I describe some of the issues to my parents or to DH's dad, they get this look in their eyes and say, "you know what? *I* was like that." or "His uncle L was *just* like that..." My mom watched him run in his awkward gait and said "He runs just like my brother did. And you did!" My FIL listened to the story of him getting in trouble for banging his legs against his desk and said "You know, I always did that, and so did Uncle L." My mom, hearing the sad tale of an awful haircut experience, told me about her grandmother thinking that going for hairdos together would be fun, and Mom remembering that anyone touching her head or hair was just torture....

    I know its more complicated than that, but I think that the roots of it are genetic. In our case, DS gets it from both sides of the family.

    I don't know what causes it to be more severe in some kids than in others, though, and that might be environmental - or it might be a specific combination of genes - getting more or fewer of the ones that trigger the sensory imbalances?

  5. #15
    Val. is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    After two years of IF treatment, I conceived naturally and though I had morning sickness, had a fairly uneventful pregnancy. My DS was delivered via csection due to prolonged, non progressive labor and his heart rate wasn't recovering as well after each contraction. At four days old he was diagnosed with a congenital birth defect of the intestines and bowels and had surgery, followed by care in the ICU. He had one problem after another. We were told when he was a baby that he was at higher risk, due to these issues, for things like sensory problems, developmental problems, learning problems, Etc. Who knows whether these events caused his issues or if they would have been there anyway. There is no way to tell, at this point, I believe.

    Don't let your brother bring you down...that was such an immature and horrid thing to say. Whatever has caused it is irrelevant at this point anyway. The focus should be on helping her function and be successful in life, given how she thinks and experiences her world.


  6. #16
    redd89 is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Well, I did injects for 3 yrs before conceiving my oldest dd. When she was 9 mths, I conceived my identical twin girls naturally. One of my twins is on the autisitic spectrum, while the other is completely "normal". So, if my twins share the same genes, why does only one have it? ANd they were natural, but were the meds still in my system? Also, I am a SAHM, and they are raised the same, eat the same, etc. Why only one twin?

    Makes me think a lot too. Reminds me of IF, always wanting answers - why?

    (((hugs)))
    Janie

  7. #17
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    mickey2 is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default what i have noticed over the past 7yrs here on inciid

    by nature, our kids are more at risk for weird things, immune issues, regualtion stuff etc b/c of our IF/mc's to begin with. most all of us on this site with children had anxiety of some form during our pg's (whether easy or bed ridden ones).

    what i have found interesting is this....those of us who had multiple mc's and treated for or suspected immune issues related to IF/mc often find ourselves on this SNK bb more so than other bbs here on inciid. has anyone else noticed this over the years??

    so my theory is genetically, our kids are more predisposed to have problems but there are a # of things that can triger or escerbate (sp?) them. ie near death experience, anxiety, health problems at birth, nicu, preemie, etc.

    we cant change the conditions in which our kids arrived in our arms but we can do our best as their moms to get them help they need to cope with life today and be sucessful in the future. so basically, dont dwell on the "how comes and whys" as much "how can i help my kid now". thats my 2 cents....stepping down now...

    ps: 7mc's, 4yrs ttc, totally bedridden entire pg, emergency csection due to placenta abruption at 34wks, , in hospital for 2wks before, severe anxiety during pg, mutliple meds for immune problems, 3wks nicu.....multiple health problems.....in our case, we'll never know the cause b/c he has too many issues that could be culprits/triggers. but both dh and i have some sensory issues as well just not to his extreme or that of his brother. hugs
    Last edited by mickey2; 01-01-2007 at 09:32 AM.

  8. #18
    peanutgallery is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    ds (SID) had the cord around his neck, etc too. My dd who doesn't have SID had many nenonatal things too (bleeding, clots, etc) and I did use a significant amount of meds to stay pg, most of which have relatively unknown results--

    Don't feel guilty. Who amongst us wouldn't have done *anything* to keep their baby or get pg? Our neurologists told us that premature babies are more likely to get SID but that there isn't a HUGE link (meaning not all premies get it, and ds wasn't premature) and birth trauma can also contribute--but as others have said, I think there's also a genetic predisposition.

    You shouldn't feel guilty any more than a mom who lives in a stressful, polluted city because that's where her job is should--the fact is, we do what we need to in order to get by, and many of the things we do are a result of limited choices and not knowing ahead of time what the end result will be.

    As the neurologists said about my ds, we do the best we can. Remember that.

  9. #19
    sugarsue is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default Oh yeah, you are reminding me of

    all the thyroid mom's on this board. Mine is Hashimoto's thyroid autoimmune disease that I've had since (diagnosed since) 1996. Interesting to think about anyway.

    Susan

  10. #20
    mrd is offline INCIIDer - A Community Creator
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    Default Don't beat yourself up....(sib ment.)

    After an IF struggle and before moving on to IUI, I got pg naturally. Had a perfectly normal health pg. DD was a fabulous baby (more about this later) and still ended up with raging SID issues. I truly feel that it is genetic. A lot of the stuff that DD has I can see bits of it in myself and in my father-in-law. I also believe that DD was such an easy baby (slept all the time, very quiet, serious baby but rarely cried) because she was so overcome by sensory input that she just shut herself down a lot because she couldn't deal.

    With my second child I had a difficult pg and he was the most horrible baby -- colic for a good eight months, never slept, screamed ALL the time. Now he is the nicest, most pleasant, most easy-going person you could meet -- just like his dad.

    I truly believe that our kids are born with a certain personality and that we can help accentuate the best in them and try to de-emphasize the negative traits, but that who they are is who they are. Don't let anyone make you feel guilty.

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